Dec 05, 2022  
2017-2018 College Catalog 
    
2017-2018 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


How to Read the Course Listings

The following listing is a basic description of courses currently offered by the college. Courses are listed alphabetically by department and numerically within the department. Descriptions are general in nature and are not intended to include all topics which may be part of the course. Specific course questions should be directed to the responsible academic department.

Explanation of Course Description Items:

Subject Code and Course Number - Each course is assigned a four-letter code identifying the course subject and a three-digit number.

Pre-requisite(s) - Course(s) that must be completed before the student is eligible to schedule the course.

Co-requisite(s) - Course(s) that must be taken during the same term as the course.

Pre- or co- requisite(s) - Course(s) that must be either completed before the student is eligible to schedule the course or taken during the same term as the course.

Lab Fee - Indicates that an additional fee will be required of students registering for the course. Lab fees vary by course from $10 and up.

Terms Offered - The term or terms the course is normally offered during the year.

Offered Distance Learning: Indicates whether the course is offered in a distance learning format. Refer to each term’s course listing for when it is offered as such. PLEASE NOTE: Distance Learning sections, or sections with a distance learning component, may have specific hardware and/or software requirements. Computers that meet these requirements are available for student use on campus.

Liberal Arts and Sciences Designation - Courses designated as Liberal Arts and Sciences electives are identified with the applicable category name:

Humanities (HUM)
Mathematics (MAT)
Science (SCI)
Social Science (SSC)

SUNY General Education Designation(s) - Courses designated as SUNY General Education electives are identified with the applicable category name(s):

American History (AH)
Arts (AR)
Basic Communications (BC)
Foreign Language (FL)
Humanities (HU)
Mathematics (MT)
Natural Science (NS)
Other World Civilizations (OC)
Social Science (SS)
Western Civilization (WC)

Applied Learning Type - Courses that include a service learning component are identified with the following abbreviations:

OSL - Optional Service Learning
RSL - Required Service Learning

Credits - The number of credits to be awarded to a student who successfully completes the course. If the credits are followed by “ND,” the course is not college-level and therefore not applicable toward a degree, but this number of hours will be included in the student’s tuition charge and course load status.

Contact Hours - Lists the type and number of contact hours per week for the course if taken in a standard term.

Lecture - The number of hours per week, during the standard term, that a particular course meets in a classroom situation.
Lab - The number of hours per week, during the standard term, that a particular course meets in a laboratory situation.
Other - The number of hours per week, during the standard term, that a particular course meets in a setting other than the classroom or laboratory. Field work, small group discussions and shop hours may be included in these hours.

  

  

  

 

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CISS 250 Database Management Systems

    This course provides a solid and practical foundation for the design, implementation and management of a database system. It familiarizes students with the basic data base models –hierarchical, Network/CODASYL, relational and object-oriented, and their capabilities with standard data base management systems. Its main focus is the combination of data base design and manipulation principles with hands-on experience. Database design is emphasized using both theory and end-user requirements, as they relate to description support activities. The overall objective is to provide the basis for a solid education in the fundamentals of data base technology and, in particular, to pave the way for an understanding of the direction in which the field is currently developing and is likely to develop in the future. Open only to matriculated Computer Information Systems students.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 100 Introduction to Computing and Information Sciences ; CISS 111 Programming and Logic II – Data Structures ; CMPT 120 Introduction to Database Concepts with Microsoft Access  or permission of department.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 4
  
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    CISS 251 Structured Query Language (SQL) And PL/SQL

    This course covers database manipulation using Structured Query Language (SQL) and Procedural Language extensions to SQL (PL/SQL) in accord with relational database management theory to meet end-user and enterprise support activity requirements. This course provides hands-on experience with the Oracle database management system (DBMS) and its procedural language extensions and Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) programming languages (e.g. Java, C/C++, .Net, PHP, COBOL, etc.)
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 100 Introduction to Computing and Information Sciences ; CISS 110 Programming and Logic I ; CMPT 120 Introduction to Database Concepts with Microsoft Access  or permission of department chair.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CISS 260 Internship

    The student will participate in a Computer Information Systems internship at an approved local organization to gain professional experience in applications programming, system and network administration, web design and development or other technological areas during the last term of study. Prior to registration, prospective CISS 260 – Internship students must prepare a resume in accord with the Center for Careers and Transfer resume guidelines and submit this resume to the Business Advisement Center in Brahan 205 or the CIS department via email. business@hvcc.edu. Students will receive additional registration information after submitting their resume. Please note that internship placement occurs on a first-come, first-serve basis; therefore, students are encouraged to submit their resumes and register early. Students may find their own internship site; however, the site must be approved by the department prior to the first day of the semester. Students who are not placed in an internship will be required to take an alternative course as approved by the department chair. Open only to matriculated Computer Information Systems or Telecommunications Technology students with 2.0 grade point index.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 210 Information Systems Analysis and Design  or permission of department.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 6
  
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    CISS 270 Advanced Routing and Wide Area Network (WAN) Infrastructure

    This course provides an in depth exploration of Wide Area Network (WAN) design through the study of the related protocols and the methods used to optimize data flow. It combines sound theoretical foundations with hands-on lab exercises to provide the students depth and experience in understanding and managing networks. Topics include hierarchal design of scalable networks, advanced features of EIGRP, OSPF and BGP routing protocols for both IPv4 and IPv6, and path control tools such as route maps, policy based routing, and route filtering. Network security concepts are integrated with nearly all topics, and students will be creating secure, authenticated designs. This course builds on the concepts taught in CISS 121 , and assumes the student has a working knowledge of standard WAN protocols and the Cisco Internetwork Operating System. This course uses the resources available at the Hudson Valley Community College CCNP networking laboratories and the Cisco Network Academy. The course content aligns with the topics covered in the Cisco routing certification exam (CCNP ROUTE 300-101) and will help prepare students for successful completion of that certification.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 121 Networking II- Intro to Network Administration .
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
  
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    CISS 271 Advanced Switching and Network Management

    The purpose of this course is to ground students in the concepts of modern LAN design, and to provide an understanding of the growing operational requirements of today’s changing networks. These changes are rooted in the continued growth in size and criticality of LANs and by the convergence of voice, streaming applications and data networks on to a common network infrastructure. Students will explore topics including network redundancy, multilayer switching, security, Rapid Spanning Tree, Quality of Service (QoS), queuing, wireless networking, and Voice over IP in depth. These concepts are underscored and reinforced through hands-on labs using relevant networking equipment and software. Many of the labs are adapted from the Cisco Certified Network Professional (CCNP) curriculum. This course builds on the intermediate switching lessons from CISS 121  and assumes the student has a working knowledge of standard LAN protocols and the Cisco Internetwork Operating System. The course content will align with the topics covered in the Building Cisco Professional-level certification exam (CCNP SWITCH 300- 115) and will help prepare students for successful completion of that certification.
    NOTE: The Cisco certification exam is not offered through the college since it is an industry-controlled certification.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 121 Networking II- Intro to Network Administration .
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
  
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    CISS 272 Advanced Networking Topics- VoIP And Wireless Technologies

    This course will present evolving and emerging topics in networking to advanced networking students. The two main focal points of this course will be VoIP (Voice over IP), 802.11n and 802.11a/c wireless implementation and advanced troubleshooting methods as presented in the Cisco Certified Network Associate and Professional (CCNA and CCNP) exam curriculums. These components will necessarily be presented with an integrated approach citing their interdependence in accord with the Enterprise Composite Network Model (ECNM). The VoIP component will present implementation QoS (Quality of Service) concepts, deployment best practices and challenges in both small and large business environments. The wireless component will focus on the 802.11n wireless technology while introducing the new 802.11a/c standard and will give students the knowledge base to survey, analyze, design, implement, configure and deploy a secure wireless infrastructure with an in-depth understanding of today’s BYOD practices. The course will also include a substantial troubleshooting component to provide students with advanced experience in correcting errors and solving complex routing and switching issues in a deployed production setting.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 121 Networking II- Intro to Network Administration .
    Pre- or co- requisite(s): CISS 271 Advanced Switching and Network Management  or permission of department chair.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 4
  
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    CISS 273 Network Security

    This course provides students with an in-depth understanding of the principles and practice of network security design. This course allows students to develop and demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to address the growing need for secure networks. The course emphasizes both an understanding of the underlying theory and the practical experience required to implement network security. Using state-of-the-art equipment, students learn to install, troubleshoot and monitor network devices to maintain integrity, confidentiality and availability of data and devices.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 121 Networking II- Intro to Network Administration  and CISS 125 Computer and Information Security .
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CISS 280 Assembly Language and Computer Architecture

    This course offers an introduction to assembly language and computer architecture. Topics include Boolean logic, date representation, processor and computer architecture, memory management, registers, machine instruction sets, addressing, subroutines, parameter passing, assembly and linking.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 111 Programming and Logic II – Data Structures  with a grade of “C” or better or permission of department chair.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 4
  
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    CISS 290 C++ Programming

    This course covers the features of the C++ programming language including class design and data structures. A modern, object-oriented approach is followed with regard to data structures and their use in programming, unified around the notion of the Standard Template Library (STL) container classes. The most useful concepts are stressed so students can begin writing programs immediately to solve real world problems. Students should possess a strong fundamental knowledge of programming concepts and control structures.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 111 Programming and Logic II – Data Structures  with a grade of “C” or better or permission of Department Chair.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 4
  
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    CISS 295 Perl Programming

    This course covers the features of the Perl programming language including scalars, strings input, output, files and data structures. The use of the Perl language and the available Perl modules, particularly the CGI modules, provides the foundation for creating robust server-side web applications. The most useful concepts are stressed so students can begin writing programs immediately to solve real world problems. Students should possess a strong fundamental knowledge of programming concepts and control structures.
    Pre-requisite(s): CISS 111 Programming and Logic II – Data Structures  with a grade of “C” or better or permission of department chair.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 4

Computer – General

  
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    CMPT 099 Computer Literacy

    The course presents introductory concepts and techniques in computing fundamentals. Students learn the technology of Microsoft operating systems, keyboard and keyboard shortcuts, use of the mouse, launching application programs, creating and managing files and folders, document naming conventions, establishing user accounts, managing open windows, moving, copying, deleting, renaming files and folders, and navigating the world wide web (www). Lab time outside class is required.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1ND
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
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    CMPT 100 Word Processing with Wordperfect

    This course will teach computer concepts and microcomputer applications using Corel WordPerfect. Students will identify the components of the WordPerfect graphical user interface, in addition to learning data and document management. Students will be given the opportunity to gain in-depth understanding of creating and modifying a wide variety of documents by performing step-by-step exercises.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 101 Computer Concepts and Applications I

    This course provides both a practical and conceptual background in computing and information processing and management fundamentals. Students receive hands-on experience while learning the latest graphical interface technology and how it interacts with word processing, spreadsheets, database management, presentation graphics and the internet. Microsoft Windows and Windows applications are the software products used. Lab time outside of class is required. Students must have some familiarity with the Windows Operation System or computers using graphical user interfaces (e.g. Mac OS or Linux). Students with no computing experience should take CMPT 099 , Computer Literacy prior to enrolling in CMPT 101.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 105 Computer Concepts and Applications II

    This course introduces students to advanced information processing concepts and applications. Students will receive hands-on experience learning and applying the latest graphical user interface (GUI) technology, advanced features in word processing, spreadsheets and database management, and the internet. The Microsoft Office Suite and Windows Operating Systems are the software products used. Lab time outside of class is required.
    Pre-requisite(s): CMPT 101 Computer Concepts and Applications I  or permission of department.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 110 Document Formatting on Microcomputers

    A review of Windows and file management will precede an introduction to word processing. This course will enable the student to develop keyboarding skills by keying the alphabetic, numeric, and symbol keys by touch in addition to computer skills mastery. The students will use MS Word to create, format and edit letter styles, envelopes, tables, memos, and reports, as well as other business documents.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 111 Information Processing

    Students will learn word processing concepts and procedures while using the latest graphical user interface (GUI) technology. This course concentrates on the instruction and preparation of the most frequently requested office documents, including electronic documents. Various internet projects will improve students’ knowledge and research skills while using the World Wide Web. Students will continue the development of keyboarding and grammatical skills.
    Pre-requisite(s): CMPT 110 Document Formatting on Microcomputers .
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 115 Introduction to Business Analytics with Microsoft Excel

    This course provides an applied introduction to business analytics using Microsoft Excel spreadsheet software within the Windows environment and maps to the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Excel core level curriculum. Topics include: Microsoft Office, worksheets and workbooks, functions, tables, templates charts and diagrams, what if analysis, external data and database integration, and collaboration and workbook distribution. Lab time outside of class is required.
    NOTE: Previous experience with computing and the Windows operating system required.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 118 Introduction to Web Design and Content Management

    This course provides both a conceptual and applied introduction to web design and content management. Topics include: W3C compliant web design, current WWW architecture, the internet, and content management systems (CMS). Students will create a multimedia rich, accessible W3C compliant website using the open source WordPress Web and Content Management System. Lab time outside of class is required.
    NOTE: Previous computing experience required.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 119 Multimedia and Graphic Design for The Web

    This course provides students with an introduction to graphic design for the web using Macromedia Fireworks and Flash. Students will use these tools to develop graphics and animations for the web, including basic graphic design skills, Flash movie development and an introduction to using ActionScript.
    Pre-requisite(s): CMPT 118 Introduction to Web Design and Content Management  or permission of department chair.
    Pre- or co- requisite(s): CISS 100 Introduction to Computing and Information Sciences  or permission of department chair.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 120 Introduction to Database Concepts with Microsoft Access

    This course provides an applied introduction to database concepts using Microsoft Access software within the Windows environment and maps the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) Access core level curriculum. Topics include: relational database management system (DBMS) concepts, the creation and maintenance of MS Access databases, the creation of forms, reports and queries, data integration with Excel worksheets, and security. Lab time outside of class is required.
    NOTE: Previous experience with computing and the Windows operating system required.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 125 Electronic Publishing and Design

    Using Adobe InDesign, the student will design and produce professional quality documents by using text, graphics, illustrations, and photos. With the use of the additional desktop publishing tools like design templates, graphic manipulation tools, color schemes, and wizards, students will create, edit, and modify newsletters, brochures, merged documents, clipart plus others. Students will create professional-looking layouts that incorporate illustrations and bitmap graphics as well as sophisticated presentations of text and typography and publish these documents to the web.
    Pre-requisite(s): CMPT 101 Computer Concepts and Applications I  or permission of department.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 135 Information Design and Applied Digital Media

    This course focuses on the structural, conceptual and heuristic design of information and its presentation using contemporary integrated digital media. Course content includes: information architecture; user–centered design (UCD) and human computer interface (HCI); search engine optimization (SEO); navigation and way-finding; accessibility; and applied integrated digital media. The course will help prepare students for knowledge management and information technology careers in management, marketing, communications, web design, and software development. This case-based course will teach students how to think through information based projects, using the principles of information design and project management and use digital media applications to turn theory into practical projects.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
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    CMPT 150 Advanced Topics in Office Technology

    In this course, students will study the history and evolution of technology in today’s automated office. The course also will discuss management styles and theories, electronic communication systems, security, PDA’s, scanners, electronic filing systems, records management, an introduction to MS Outlook, time management, ergonomics, career opportunities and professional certification. Students will create representational portfolios.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  

Construction Technology

  
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    CNST 100 Construction Surveying

    Students will study the usage of tapes, levels and transits for field layout of structures and services; theory and field practice with respect to reference line layout, as well as horizontal and vertical placement of structures on site.
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 3
  
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    CNST 103 Blueprint Reading for Technologies

    This course will cover the study of blueprints that are common to the field of construction and familiarize students with various types of drawings, such as site drawings, floor plans, detail drawings, construction, electrical, plumbing drawings and heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) plans, and construction systems.
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 110 Statics and Strength of Materials

    This course will cover vectors and force systems, centroids, moment of inertia, stresses and strains in homogeneous and elastic bodies, temperature stresses, mechanical properties of materials, shear and bending moment, stresses in beams, and deflection and column theory.
    Pre-requisite(s): MATH 110 Intermediate Algebra  with a grade of “C” or higher.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
  
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    CNST 130 Principles and Practices of Light Construction I

    This course emphasizes the study of light wood frame construction. Major topics include: floor, wall and roof framing; building layout; foundations systems; exterior and interior finishes; doors and windows; and applicable codes and building department regulations.
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 131 Construction Laboratory I

    This is a practical laboratory course that will allow students to develop skills in residential construction.
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lab: 6
  
  
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    CNST 133 Principles and Practices of Light Construction II

    Major topics in this course include advanced roof framing, stair layout, structural systems analysis, framing layout, framing member sizing, and an introduction to masonry and steel frame construction.
    Pre-requisite(s): CNST 130 Principles and Practices of Light Construction I .
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 4
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 202 Construction Planning and Control

    Management is an important function in construction. This course deals with management in general and project management in particular. The critical path method is emphasized as a tool in planning and control, and high powered construction management computer software will be used for projects.
    Pre-requisite(s): CNST 103 Blueprint Reading for Technologies .
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 210 Steel Construction

    In this course, students will study steel construction methods, steel detailing, and erection and design. It also covers design and analysis of steel beams, tension and compression members, and an introduction to the theory of connections. Students will participate in the erection of a pre-fabricated structural steel building as part of the class.
    NOTE: Students should contact the department to determine which pre-requisite would be appropriate based on career goals.
    Pre-requisite(s): CIVL 112 Statics and Strength of Materials  or CNST 110 Statics and Strength of Materials  with a grade of “C” or higher in either course.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 211 Concrete Construction

    This course covers placement and curing of concrete, reinforcing bar detailing and placement, reinforced concrete construction methods and practice, and an introduction to form work design.
    NOTE: Students should contact the department to determine which pre-requisite would be appropriate based on career goals.
    Pre-requisite(s): CIVL 112 Statics and Strength of Materials  or CNST 110 Statics and Strength of Materials  with a grade of “C” or higher in either course.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
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    CNST 220 Architectural Drawing II

    This course is a continuation of CNST 120 , and covers more complex commercial construction with extensive use of applicable building codes.
    Pre-requisite(s): CNST 120 Architectural Drawing I .
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lab: 4
  
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    CNST 230 Construction Management Seminar

    Students will learn business ownership and organization, construction contracts, bonding, insurance, labor law, labor relations, project safety, and motivation techniques. Word processing and spreadsheet computer software also will be introduced.
    Pre-requisite(s): CIVL 110 Engineering Graphics  or CNST 103 Blueprint Reading for Technologies .
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2
  
  
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    CNST 232 Site Development

    This course covers the legal regulations for land planning, development, design, and construction of site plans including a review of stormwater, sanitary and road design. In addition, the course will look at the economics of site design as it relates to location, cost and time. A design project will be assigned for either a typical residential subdivision or large commercial project. The final project will include building footprint(s), siting of the building(s), façade studies, a DEIS and construction documents. Cost estimates and project schedules will be developed.
    Pre-requisite(s): ( CIVL 101 Surveying I  and CNST 103 Blueprint Reading for Technologies ) or ( CIVL 102 Architectural Fundamentals  and CIVL 223 Introduction to Building Technology )
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 3
  
  
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    CNST 270 Soils in Construction

    This course will cover soil classification and investigation, groundwater, drainage, frost action, earth construction, lateral earth pressures, bearing capacity, and piles and settlement. Students also will conduct lab tests and prepare reports.
    Lab fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2

Craft

  
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    CRFT 100 Craft Seminar

    In this course, advanced-level students will have the opportunity to concentrate their efforts and develop in one media. Students will be involved in research on a technique or stylistic development that will culminate in a written paper and a visual representation of their research. The student will work closely with the instructor to determine the exact topic of concentration. Students also will develop their technical skills and design concepts. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): Two credits of Introductory and Intermediate and Advanced Studio.
    Co-requisite(s): Class attendance in Advanced Level Studio.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
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    CRFT 101 Introduction to Furniture Making

    This course is an introduction to the practical application of basic knowledge of wood, using hand tools to make standard furniture joinery. This course involves the use of hand and power tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
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    CRFT 102 Introduction to Woodcarving

    This is an introductory course in woodcarving with relief and chip carving techniques and includes the techniques of hand-carving, stamping, varnishing and staining. Students will complete three finished products in this class that demonstrate chip relief carving. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination. Students will be required to purchase a set of carving tools.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
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    CRFT 111 Introduction to Pottery

    This is an introductory studio course in stoneware ceramics. Through lectures, wheel throwing, and hand-building, students will explore the aesthetic, sculptural, and functional possibilities of clay. Techniques will be demonstrated and lectures will feature technical information on high temperature firing and stoneware glazes. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
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    CRFT 112 Ceramic Sculpture

    This course is designed to introduce clay in a sculptural context. Traditional techniques of solid form manipulation and subtractive and additive methods will be presented. Projects will include an anatomical hand sculpture, an abstract sculpture, and a self-directed project. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 111 Introduction to Pottery .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
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    CRFT 122 Spinning and Dyeing: An Introduction

    This course is an introduction to natural and man-made fibers and will cover preparation of fibers for spinning, and an introduction to spinning techniques on both a drop spindle and spinning wheel. It will also cover an introduction to chemical and natural dyes, and the practice of dyeing techniques of fibers produced in the studio. Fiber and tools will be provided. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRFT 131 Beginning Printmaking

    This is an introduction to the form of printmaking. Students will learn a variety of techniques for creating images on monotype plates. Students will work on single-pass and multi-pass printing that combines additive, subtractive, tracing, stencil and transfer techniques. Students will make a carborundum plate as a one-of-a-kind collograph that can produce multiple prints. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 132 Introduction to Screen Printing

    This is an introductory course to explore the process of screen printing from its commercial uses such as posters and cards, to the creative aspects. Students will study stenciling methods and multiple color printing, and explore and develop creative possibilities of producing multiple images by using two screen printing methods: stenciling and block-out. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRFT 133 Paper Making Techniques

    This course will cover construction of paper pulps from low-cost natural or recycled fibers. Students will learn the construction of a mold and deckle for forming sheets of hand-made paper; methods of making casting molds; and the use of hand-made paper for making relief prints. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRFT 141 Jewelry I

    This is an introductory course covering fundamental concepts and techniques of both the design and creation of original jewelry. It includes the techniques of piercing and filing, soldering and polishing. Students will work with metal alone and in combination with other materials, such as wood, plexiglass, etc. Development of individual designs will be encouraged. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 142 Enameling: An Introduction

    Students will be introduced to the process of enameling on copper and cloisonne enameling, which is done on silver. The physical characteristics of enamel will be explored as well as several techniques for enamel application. Students will experiment with color, both opaque and transparent, and the effects of color on the two different materials. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 141 Jewelry I .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 151 Introduction to Stained Glass Techniques

    This course is an introduction to basic stained glass techniques and will explore Tiffany Foil aspects of two-dimensional stained glass construction, including preliminary work, glass cutting, soldering and cleaning. Design and color theory, as it relates to stained glass, will be explored through lecture, examples and demonstrations. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 200 Advanced Furniture Making

    In this course, students will engage in the study and practice of advanced techniques of furniture making. The properties of various woods and inlay processes will be taught and the focus will be on the aesthetics of form as well as function. A final project incorporating learned techniques is required. This course involves the use of hand and power tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 101 Introduction to Furniture Making .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 211 Pottery II (Intermediate Pottery)

    This course continues the student’s development of pottery techniques with a focus on refining both technical and aesthetic pursuits. The emphasis will be to bring students’ skills to a point where the creative aspects of the medium may be explored freely with emphasis on traditional form. A more in-depth exploration of glaze technology, various kiln atmospheres and firing techniques, as well as a more complex treatment of surface decoration will be pursued. The historical background of ceramic art, from ancient to contemporary times, will be explored. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 111 Introduction to Pottery .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 221 Weaving II

    This course is designed for students who have completed Weaving I or have some weaving experience. It will include the study of color and design in relation to woven apparel fabric as well as the contemporary use of textiles produced on a four-harness loom. Dyeing, fabric structures and off loom techniques also will be explored. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 121, Intro to Fiber Arts: Weaving I.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 222 Spinning and Dyeing II

    This is an advanced course that will cover spinning and dyeing, compound threads, working with natural and manmade fibers, and spinning of complex and mixed threads on a drop spindle and spinning wheel. Students will learn manipulation of color and design of compound threads and fibers, and the preparation of fibers for thick-thins, flakes, boules and other mixed threads. Theory and studio work will be combined in this course. Fibers and tools will be provided. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 122 Spinning and Dyeing: An Introduction .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRFT 231 Intermediate Printmaking

    This course will explore relief and intaglio processes through direct manipulation of copper plate and wood surfaces. Techniques of creating uniform editions, black and white and color images, and ink properties will be explored. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 131 Beginning Printmaking .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 241 Jewelry II

    This is an advanced course in metalworking and jewelry design that will allow students to refine basic skills and explore advanced techniques. Stone setting, forming and fabricating skills will expand the student’s knowledge and allow for more advanced designs. Control of the material to achieve desired results will be emphasized. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 141 Jewelry I .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 242 Enameling II

    In this course, students will be engaged in the study and practice of advanced enameling techniques. Cold joint and a variety of closures will be explored to expand the student’s knowledge and creative possibilities. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 142 Enameling: An Introduction .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 251 Stained Glass II

    This course is a continuing development of stained glass techniques with refinement in both technical and aesthetic pursuits. The use of glass in the construction of three dimensional forms, especially lamp and terrarium forms will be emphasized. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 151 Introduction to Stained Glass Techniques .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 271 Advanced Pottery

    This class is designed for the experienced pottery student. Students will be involved in advanced pottery techniques and will explore clay as a creative medium. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 211 Pottery II (Intermediate Pottery) .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 283 Weaving III

    This class is for students continuing with the study of fabric structure, color and design of textile, and actual performance of techniques on the loom. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 221 Weaving II  and CRFT 222 Spinning and Dyeing II .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 291 Advanced Jewelry – Stone Setting

    Techniques of setting cabochon and faceted stones in both hand-made and commercial settings will be taught in this course. Construction of bezel and basket settings for round- and fancy-shaped stones will be covered, as well as tube and channel settings. Stone and gem identification and individual characteristics of stones will be discussed. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRFT 141 Jewelry I  and CRFT 241 Jewelry II .
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRFT 295 Marketing Your Art/Craft

    This course introduces artists and crafts persons to the skills and resources needed to market their own work. It will provide information skills in the areas of: establishing credibility, developing portfolios and printed materials, securing exhibitions, direct selling, public relations, legal questions, and financial management for the artist/craftsperson. This course involves the use of hand tools requiring fine motor coordination.
    Materials fee will be required
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1

Criminal Justice

  
  •  

    CRJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    This course is a survey of the historical and philosophical development of law enforcement. It will analyze the major components of the criminal justice system: police, courts and corrections, the criminal justice process and current trends in the field.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 110 Intro to Criminal Law

    This course is an introduction to criminal law in the United States. The course begins with an overview of the American criminal justice system. Substantive criminal law and procedural criminal law, including probable cause and search and seizure, are covered during the semester.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 120 Ethics and Criminal Justice

    This course explores the ethical dilemmas present in the criminal justice system. Current issues in policing, corrections, courts and forensic science will be covered.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 130 Legal Issues for Animal Control

    This is an overview of the role of law enforcement and animal control officers in the animal advocacy field. NYS Article 7, as well as current case law, environmental law, and vehicle and traffic law, as they pertain to animals will also be covered.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 131 Forensic Assessment of Animal Cruelty Investigations

    This course deals with the issues of animal cruelty, animal fighting and the veterinarian’s role in animal advocacy. Investigation and documentation of non-accidental injuries as well as trace evidence, chain of custody, and evidence collection will be covered.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 132 Shelter and Rescue Management

    This course will examine shelter and rescue regulations and policies, facility design and function, as well as shelter/ rescue animals’ needs.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 133 Introduction to Animal Advocacy

    This course will analyze the various facets of advocating for animals from the perspectives of both welfare and rights at local, national and global levels. The basics of advocacy, as well as advocacy techniques, will be discussed.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 135 Animal Policy Seminar I

    This seminar-based course explores contemporary issues in animal policy. The seminar will provide an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic. The particular area of focus will be announced each term.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRJS 136 Animal Policy Seminar II

    This seminar-based course explores contemporary issues in animal policy. The seminar will provide an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic. The particular area of focus will be announced each term.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
  
  •  

    CRJS 137 Animal Policy Seminar III

    This seminar-based course explores contemporary issues in animal policy. The seminar will provide an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic. The particular area of focus will be announced each term.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 150 Principles of Criminal Investigation I

    This course is an analysis of the nature and purpose of criminal investigation. Students will discuss various methods of investigation, the interview and interrogation of suspects, collection and preservation of evidence, use of informants, techniques of surveillance and special investigation techniques and an overview of forensic services.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 151 Principles of Criminal Investigation II

    This course is a continuation of theories and methods of investigation covered in Principles of Criminal Investigation I. Specific crimes such as arson, burglary, rape and enterprise crime will be explained in detail. Open only to matriculated Criminal Justice students.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRJS 150 Principles of Criminal Investigation I .
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 155 Concepts in Forensic Science

    This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles of the field of forensic science. The role of forensic science in criminal and civil investigations where interpretation of physical evidence is crucial will be covered.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 190 Introduction to Evidence

    This is an introductory course on the topic of evidence and how it relates to the judicial process. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, hearsay, the exclusionary rule, Federal Rules of Evidence, scientific and physical evidence, search and seizure and witness testimony.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 195 Victimology

    This course is designed to provide the student with varied perspectives on crime victimization, including history and measurement of victimization, the science of victimology, consequences and forms of victimization, victims’ rights and victim advocacy. This course will also familiarize the student with current trends and issues in victimology including underserved populations and new forms of victimization data, the role of the victim and the impact of the victimization on the criminal justice system.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Liberal Arts and Sciences Designation: Social Science
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 200 Children and The Law

    This course is designed to introduce students to non-delinquency issues facing children in the legal system. It will cover the right to counsel and advocacy for children in the areas of child abuse and neglect, custody, support, domestic violence, status offenses and education matters.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 201 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems

    This course examines alternative systems of criminal justice in the United States and foreign countries. The study of the various systems is intended to create more critical evaluation of familiar agencies and systems. The major goal of this course is for students to understand the existence of and differences among various criminal justice systems.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 202 Probation, Parole and Community Corrections

    This course is a survey of the origins, theories, practices and critical issues in probation and parole, including discussion of diversion, victim services, dispute mediation and other significant trends in community corrections. This course will discuss the various theories of correctional philosophy and how these are reflected in practice and will include a critical analysis of recent trends in community services.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 203 Introduction to Family Violence

    This course is designed to provide students with varied perspectives on family violence, including historical, legal, cultural and political views; to familiarize students with current trends and issues in partner (relationship) abuse, elder abuse, physical child abuse and child sexual abuse; to inform students about current research on the nature and dynamics of family violence; and to increase students’ understanding of the criminal justice, mental health, health care and social service responses to the victims, offenders and family members that are affected by violence in the family.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 204 Women and Criminal Justice

    This course is designed to give students an understanding of the basic theoretical foundations of women in criminal justice. This course will cover a broad range of topics including the importance of understanding the emergence of gender in criminology; the importance of understanding the role of gender, race, age and class in the criminal justice system; and learning about women as victims and offenders of crime. This course also will address the role of women as practitioners and professionals in the field of criminal justice. Students will have the opportunity to integrate theory with practical application in order to better understand the material.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRJS 101 Introduction to Criminal Justice  or SOCL 100 Sociology  or PSYC 100 General Psychology .
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 205 Policing

    This course focuses on the mutual interaction of the criminal justice system (police, courts, and corrections) with the public. Areas of discussion include: the nature of the community; community involvement; criminal justice agencies and community relations; prejudice and discrimination; civil rights and liberties.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 210 Constitutional Law

    This course includes a history of the United States Constitution, describes the structure of American government as developed through court interpretation of the Constitution and emphasizes constitutional safeguards of liberty and property. The objective of this course is to acquaint students with the judicial system, and structure and process of Constitutional litigation through a detailed study of the rights of citizens.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 215 Introduction to Industrial Security

    This course explores the historical and philosophical background of modern industrial security: including the comparison of security and police operations; and security of the private, governmental and international levels.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 216 Security Administration

    This course is an introduction to security administration, covering the historical and legal framework for security operations on both the private and governmental level. It will include a detailed presentation of security processes and programs currently utilized in providing security in a democratic society. Attention also will be given to international security organizations, their organization, administration and operational limits.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 218 Computer Security

    This course will examine the concept of a total program of protection from the conventional aspects of physical security to sophisticated protection of hardware, software and communications.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 219 Physical Security and Safety

    This course will explore concepts of physical security integrated with management systems: physical security requirements and standard; alarms and surveillance devised; animate security; and costing, planning and engineering. Principles of safety practices and regulations; fire prevention; property conservation; occupational hazards and personal safeguards also will be discussed.
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 220 Security Law

    This course is designed to acquaint students with basic legal issues facing the private police officer. Students will examine the general sources of legal powers and limitations concerning private police, including an overview of substantive criminal law. Major topics will include the relative legal powers of private citizens, private and public police; investigator function of private police, law of arrest, search and seizure; use of force; and the legal relationship between users and providers of private security services.
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 221 Terrorism and The Criminal Justice System

    This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental principles of terrorism and how it affects, and is handled by, the criminal justice system. Topics include identification of terrorist activities, investigative techniques, and prevention strategies.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 222 Principles of Homeland Security

    This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental principles of homeland security. The course provides an overview of major issues in homeland security, current homeland security law and organizational structure of the Federal Department of Homeland Security.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Liberal Arts and Sciences Designation: Social Science
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 230 Animal Law I

    This is an introductory course designed to acquaint students with the fundamental principles of animal law and the criminal justice system. Specific topics include the history of animal law, protection of animals by anticruelty laws, animal fighting, the social movement of animals in the legal system, and constitutional issues raised in cases involving animals.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 231 Animal Law II

    This course is designed to build upon the fundamental principles introduced in Animal Law I. Specific topics include New York animal cruelty laws and enforcement, lobbying, animals in science, access to courts, pet trusts, veterinary malpractice, damages, and private and state regulation of ownership.
    Pre-requisite(s): CRJS 220 Security Law .
    Terms Offered: Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 235 Lobbying and Legislation for Animal Policy

    This course is an introduction to the legislative process at the town, county, state and federal level. The course covers the use of the media and various mechanisms for lobbying for animal issues. This course requires a basic knowledge of animal policy and legal issues.
    Pre- or co- requisite(s): CRJS 231 Animal Law II .
    Terms Offered: Fall
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 236 Animal Abuse, Interpersonal Violence and The Justice System

    A strong connection has been documented between animal abuse and interpersonal and/or family violence. This course will provide students with an opportunity to learn about why this connection exists and how to address it within the criminal justice system. Definition, statistics, warning signs, theories and possible solutions to the problem will be critiqued and examined.
    Terms Offered: Fall, Spring
    Offered Distance Learning: Yes
    Credits: 3
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 3
  
  •  

    CRJS 240 Criminal Justice Seminar I

    This seminar-based course explores contemporary issues in the criminal justice system. The seminar will provide students with an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic. The particular area of focus will be announced each term.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 1
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 1
  
  •  

    CRJS 241 Criminal Justice Seminar II

    This seminar-based course explores contemporary issues in the criminal justice system. The seminar will provide students with an in-depth understanding of a chosen topic. The particular area of focus will be announced each term.
    Terms Offered: Offered on demand
    Offered Distance Learning: No
    Credits: 2
    Contact Hours:
    Lecture: 2
 

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